An Grand Early Start to Black History Month

New Music Buff


The United States (unlike England who use the 31 day month October) has chosen the shortest month of the year to celebrate Black History  but I have managed to get 30 days to celebrate this year by starting a day early in this leap year.  Basically I cheated, deal with it.

This is the year of the last term of our first black president and, while that is a historically significant fact, so are the facts of the police killings that demands the development of interventions like “Black Lives Matter” to remind society of a fact that should be obvious but clearly is not, that we have a serious human rights crisis here.  However, rather than getting into yet another acknowledgement of our racist society, I am interested in sharing a wonderful positive experience that I hope will provide as much inspiration to my readers as it did to the…

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Joseph Charles Price an Unsung Hero

Thanks to Dr. Lenwood Davis for this article.

Tradition of Excellence

By Dr. Lenwood Davis

During Black History Month a number of African American heroes are discussed such as Crispus Attucks, Benjamin Banneker, Mary McLeod Bethune, George Washington Carver, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks,  A. Phillip Randolph, Paul Robeson, Sojourner Truth, Nat Turner, Malcolm X and too many others to name.

Among the number of Unsung African American heroes who are usually forgotten is Joseph Charles Price.  He was a major African American leader between 1880 – 1893.

Joseph Charles Price was born in Elizabeth City, N.C. on Feb. 10, 1854.  Emily Paulin, his mother, was born a free African American woman and his father, Charles Dozier, was a slave. During Slavery the child always followed the status of the mother.  Since Price’s mother was a free woman, he also was a free child.  Price and his mother moved to New Bern, N.C., to…

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Black History Celebration: A work in progress

Black History Collecting


       Collecting is available to anyone in every city and state. You can start with a book, a post card, or a record album.  Your collection will include items near you and around you. Someone from Texas will have items from their community and they will differ from items collected in North Carolina. As your collection grows you will find historical items that the whole country will be familiar with such as an old newspaper about Rosa Parks.

        I will share with you what I have found, and where I found it when possible, and hopefully you will begin to appreciate or should I say, celibrate the amazing Black History that is all around us.

This is a “work in progress” for me. I hope you come along and see the wonderful pieces of Black History that I have collected.



Important memorabilia does not need to be large. A uniform, a signed book or a historical poster does not necessarily overshadow a simple letter. Here is an example.

Read the words. Feel the power of someone wanting to pay tribute to Joseph C. Price,  one of the greatest men of his generation.                                                                                                                                                             Image (28)


I look at art from two perspectives. I include African American artists as well as African Americans as the subject of art. Virginia Fouche Bolton was a beloved South Carolina artist known for her watercolors of Charleston and the Gullah people of Edisto.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  FOUCHE venus_my_friend FOUCHE lord_come_sit_by_my_window


Once in a while, I will get my soapbox out and share what’s on my mind. This is my first SOAPBOX.

The way I feel right now, the smile, the joy and the amazement is exactly how I hope a child feels when they see a piece of Black History. It is the connection, the touching and being touched by something real and historical.

Today, Bill Doggett accepted my friend request on Facebook. WOW!  Be sure to visit his site. I am just amazed. Soooo much scholarly information. #overwhelmed